Jumperturn.top Review Is Jumperturn Scam or Legit Online Store

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Which scams are having the most devastating impact on consumers?

New Risks and Emerging Technologies: 2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report uses data submitted by consumers to BBB Scam Tracker to shed light on how scams are being perpetrated, who is being targeted, which scams have the greatest impact, and much more. The BBB Risk Index helps us better understand which scams pose the highest risk by looking at three factors—exposure, susceptibility, and monetary loss. The 2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report is a critical part of BBB’s ongoing work to contribute new, useful data and analysis to further the efforts of all who are engaged in combating marketplace fraud.

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2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report: New Risks and Emerging Technologies

2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report: Data at a Glance

2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report: Canada

BBB Risk Index: A Three-Dimensional Approach to Measuring Scam Risk

Exposure x Susceptibility x Monetary Loss = Risk

EXPOSURE
How likely are you to be targeted by a particular scam?

SUSCEPTIBILITY
What are your odds of losing money when you are exposed?

MONETARY LOSS
If you do lose money to a scam, how big will your losses be?

Take action. Report a scam.

Report a scam to the BBB. Help the Better Business Bureau investigate frauds and schemes and warn others by reporting what you know.

Online Shopping Scams

AARP | Comments: 0

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En español | The internet continues to reshape the way we shop, with retail apps and social media stores adding to consumers’ online options. Cybercriminals are keeping pace. Online purchasing was the most common scam type reported to the Better Business Bureau (BBB) in 2020, representing nearly 1 in 4 complaints, and the one that most often led to a financial loss, according to the BBB’s annual “Scam Tracker Risk Report.”

Have you seen this scam?

  • Call the AARP Fraud Watch Network Helpline: 877-908-3360
  • Report it on AARP’s Scam-Tracking Map

Sign up for Watchdog Alerts for more tips on avoiding scams.

The typical shopping scam starts with a bogus website or, increasingly, mobile app. Some faux e-stores are invented from whole cloth, but many mimic trusted retailers, with familiar logos and slogans and a URL that’s easily mistaken for the real thing. They offer popular items at a fraction of the usual cost and promise perks like free shipping and overnight delivery, exploiting the premium online shoppers put on price and speed.

Some of these copycats do deliver merchandise — shoddy knockoffs worth less than even the “discount” price you mistook for a once-in-a-lifetime deal on, say, Tiffany watches or Timberland boots. More often, you’ll wait in vain for your purchase to arrive. And your losses might not stop there: Scammers may seed phony sites, apps or links in pop-up ads and email coupons with malware that infects your device and harvests personal information for use in identity theft.

Clothing and jewelry, furniture and home decor, electronics, cosmetics, health and nutrition, and pets are among the most common categories of products in shopping scams, according to the BBB. Not surprisingly, these frauds flourish during the holiday season. You need not forgo the ease and endless selection of online shopping, but these precautions can help you make sure you get what you pay for.

SCAM WATCH

Online shopping scams involve scammers pretending to be legitimate online sellers, either with a fake website or a fake ad on a genuine retailer site.

How this scam works

While many online sellers are legitimate, unfortunately scammers can use the anonymous nature of the internet to rip off unsuspecting shoppers.

Scammers use the latest technology to set up fake retailer websites that look like genuine online retail stores. They may use sophisticated designs and layouts, possibly stolen logos, and even a ‘.com.au’ domain name and stolen Australian Business Number (ABN).

Many of these websites offer luxury items such as popular brands of clothing, jewellery and electronics at very low prices. Sometimes you will receive the item you paid for but they will be fake, other times you will receive nothing at all.

The biggest tip-off that a retail website is a scam is the method of payment. Scammers will often ask you to pay using a money order, pre-loaded money card, or wire transfer, but if you send your money this way, it’s unlikely you will see it again or receive your purchased item.

A newer version of online shopping scams involves the use of social media platforms to set up fake online stores. They open the store for a short time, often selling fake branded clothing or jewellery. After making a number of sales, the stores disappear. They also use social media to advertise their fake website, so do not trust a site just because you have seen it advertised or shared on social media. The best way to detect an fake trader or social media online shopping scam is to search for reviews before purchasing.

Warning signs

  • A product is advertised at an unbelievably low price, or advertised to have amazing benefits or features that sound too good to be true.
  • The other party insists on immediate payment, or payment by electronic funds transfer or a wire service. They may insist that you pay up-front for vouchers before you can access a cheap deal or a give-away.

The social media based store is very new and selling products at very low prices. The store may have limited information about delivery and other policies.

  • An online retailer does not provide adequate information about privacy, terms and conditions of use, dispute resolution or contact details. The seller may be based overseas, or the seller does not allow payment through a secure payment service such as PayPal or a credit card transaction.
  • Protect yourself

    Check if the website or social media page has a refund or returns policy, and that their policies sound fair. The better online shopping and auction sites have detailed complaint or dispute handling processes in case something goes wrong.

    Avoid any arrangement with a stranger that asks for up-front payment via money order, wire transfer, international funds transfer, pre-loaded card or electronic currency, like Bitcoin. It is rare to recover money sent this way. Never send money or give credit card or online account details to anyone you don’t know or trust.

    Have you been scammed?

    If you have bought something online and there is a problem, you should first try to contact the retailer or auction service. There may be a legitimate reason for the problem.

    If you are not satisfied with the response and suspect that it may be a scam, you may be able to arrange a charge-back through your bank or credit union if you have paid by credit card. You may wish to contact your local consumer protection agency to seek assistance.

    We encourage you to report scams to the ACCC via the report a scam page. This helps us to warn people about current scams, monitor trends and disrupt scams where possible. Please include details of the scam contact you received, for example, email or screenshot.

    Spread the word to your friends and family to protect them.

    How to spot a fake, fraudulent or scam website

    Online scams

    We’re urging the government to ensure companies safeguard us all from scams.

    Safeguard us from scams

    Fraud is now at record levels, and while there are sensible steps we can all take to protect ourselves, an unfair burden has been placed on the public.

    Join us in calling on the government, regulators and businesses to do more to safeguard us all from scams.

    Eight ways to spot a fake, fraudulent or scam website

    It can be difficult to spot a fake, fraudulent or scam website. Fraudsters are extremely cunning and good at creating convincing websites.

    Take these eight simple steps to test whether a website is legitimate or not.

    1 Double-check the domain name

    A lot of fraudulent websites will use a domain name that references a well-known brand or product name. But won’t be the official website.

    For example, website domains such as www.ipadoffers.net or www.discountnikeclothes.com should raise alarm bells.

    You should also be cautious of domains that end in .net or .org, as they are rarely used for online shopping so may have been acquired by questionable organisations.

    2 Is the offer too good to be true?

    When you see very low prices with ridiculous discounts, you should be a bit suspicious. If prices seem too good to be true then, sadly, they probably are.

    Scam websites use low prices to lure bargain-hungry shoppers to quickly sell fake, counterfeit or non-existent items.

    You can use our tips for spotting a scam to help you identify if something is actually a good deal or simply a con.

    3 Never pay by bank transfer

    Alarm bells should ring if you are asked to pay for something online via a bank transfer.

    If you buy something that turns out to be fake or non-existent with a credit or debit card, you do have some rights to get your money back.

    But if you pay by bank transfer, there’s very little you can do to get your cash back.

    4 Browse the website

    Take a couple of minutes to double-check the site. Maybe visit the homepage or the ‘About us’ pages and read the text there.

    Watch out for poor English, such as spelling and grammar mistakes, or phrases that don’t sound quite right.

    It could mean the site isn’t genuine and was put together by someone abroad looking to make a quick profit.

    You should also check that the website lists any contact information.

    Reputable and legitimate companies will always list ways to get in touch with them; if the website doesn’t have a ‘Contact us’ page, it could well be fraudulent.

    If the site does have ‘Contact us’ page but only offers a form to fill out, be wary as this could also be an indication of a dubious website.

    Any company offering goods or services should list a place of business, as well as a phone number or email address through which to contact them.

    If none of this information is available, you should treat the website as highly suspicious.

    5 Check the returns policy

    If the company is selling a product online, it should have a shipping and returns policy listed on its website.

    If it’s a real company, it should tell you how and where to return a faulty item.

    The website should also have terms and conditions, and a privacy policy that tells you exactly what it plans to do with any data you share and any extra contractual rights you may have.

    6 Read some online reviews

    Look at reviews across a number of sources, such as Trustpilot, Feefo or Sitejabber, which aggregate customer reviews.

    Don’t look at just one review website – check several to avoid being influenced by .

    You should also check the company’s social media pages for recent activity and to see what other people are posting on their social channels.

    Spot a fake review

    Use our top tips to spot a fake review:

    1. Are there lots of oddly similar reviews?

    It should be a red flag if you notice a similarity in the reviews across several websites.

    Reading through reviews, you might notice a whole set that use similar word groupings and writing style.

    This often means the reviewers are either copying information or that the reviews were all written by the same person.

    2. Are the reviewers all very new?

    Watch out for reviews from new accounts. Some of the reviews should be from long-standing members of the site.

    You might find the person has reviewed hundreds of websites, which gives them more credibility than someone who’s only reviewed one site.

    3. Is the review non-factual or overly factual?

    Facts are important in a review; don’t trust a review if facts or actionable information is light on the ground.

    Similarly, a review that gives no personal opinion at all may well be a fake – and in any case, it’s not a great deal of help.

    4. Can you only find very few reviews?

    In this case, it’s probably best to give any suspicious website a miss.

    7 Can you trust a trust mark?

    Research carried out by ANEC, a European consumer organisation, found that seven in ten people say they’re more likely to use a website with a trust-mark label or logo.

    But with more than 50 different trust-mark labels and logos in use across Europe, and many countries also not using them at all, they are not always a sound way of judging whether a website is trustworthy.

    Also, just because a website appears to carry the logo of a reputable trade organisation, it still doesn’t necessarily mean the website is genuine.

    If you’re in doubt, you could always contact the trust-mark company to check.

    8 Look for a padlock

    A padlock next to a website’s URL means the site is encrypted, so what you do on on it – such as browse or make payments – can’t be intercepted.

    Most websites now have this feature, so if you notice a site doesn’t have one it could be a red flag.

    But equally, scammers are able to forge or buy these padlocks so seeing one doesn’t always mean a website is safe.

    Checking for a padlock should always be combined with the other checks we’ve recommended.

    The American Greed Report: Online shopping scams: Eight signs you’re on a fake site

    The Better Business Bureau has been warning consumers against Pandorapick.com. The site boasts discounts of “up to 75% off” on jewelry such as charm bracelets, charms, beads and earrings.

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    Pandorapick.com closely resembles Pandora Jewelry’s site, Pandora.net. Pandora is a legitimate Danish jewelry company with U.S. headquarters in Baltimore. But Pandorapick.com, the Better Business Bureau says, is selling “cheap imitations from China.” They’ve received complaints through their Scam Tracker tool from users who’ve received low-quality items.

    The two sites look similar at first blush, but a closer look at Pandorapick.com reveals red flags such as grammatical errors and a statement on the payment page saying the buyer may be charged international fees.

    Pandora Jewelry writes on its website, “Pandora will continue to fight those who attempt to abuse our name and brand to sell counterfeit products and deceive our customers, and our Brand Protection team maintains the highest standards of brand protection.”

    According to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the global counterfeit trade industry is worth nearly half a trillion dollars a year. And cheap knockoffs are not the only problem. “There are a lot of websites that are not even shipping a fake product, they’re just taking money and running,” says David DeMille, a security expert with A Secure Life, a website that offers advice about all aspects of personal security as well as reviews of products such as home security systems and anti-virus software.

    If you see a great deal online, it can be tempting to grab it right away — but first, protect your wallet by knowing how to spot some major warning signs.

    Too-steep discounts

    If you see a deal on an item that seems a little too good to be true, do some price comparison shopping before you click “purchase.” Visit websites of other retailers and see if you can find any similar deals on the same product. Usually, other retailers will try to compete if one is offering a big discount. DeMille recommends the website shopstyle.com, which is essentially a search engine for fashion products. “They vet the companies they’re working with, so they’re all legitimate,” DeMille said. You can search for the type of item or brand you’re looking for — and look for new sales and deals on that item. Let’s say you see a handbag for $50 on a site you’re not sure is legitimate. If you don’t see any on sale for under $100 on shopstyle.com, the site you saw is likely a fake.

    Poor website design and sloppy English

    Fashion companies specialize in design — and most spend good money on perfecting the design of their site. “They’re always going to want to have the best imagery of their products and it’s going to be shiny and fancy,” says DeMille. Poor-quality photos and cluttered, unprofessional-looking design are huge red flags that the site can’t be trusted. Also, read the fine print carefully before buying anything. Look out for strange wording or spelling and grammar mistakes, as it’s common for these sites to be run out of countries where English isn’t the first language.

    A suspect domain name

    Most retail websites have simple URLs — like michaelkors.com, louisvuitton.com or calvinklein.us. If the company has a trademark on its name, its domain name typically matches that name. If you see extra words in the URL like “deals,” “sales” or “super discounts,” as well as extra characters, there’s a good chance the website is a scam. You can also type an address into Google’s Transparency Report to see the site’s safety rating from Google.

    The site hasn’t been around for very long

    With some exceptions, most established brand names and retailers have been on the Internet for years. If you’re not sure about a site, check the Wayback Machine, an archive of the Internet found at archive.org. Users can look up a website and see archived versions of the website across time. “You can actually see what content used to be there, what design used to be there,” DeMille said. “It could be a big red flag if within the past year the website came into being.”

    You can’t pay with a credit or debit card

    Beware if the seller is requiring you to pay by money order, bitcoin, cash, wire transfer or a prepaid gift card. Reputable sites will almost always allow you to pay with secure methods, such as credit cards, debit cards or PayPal. With methods such as wire transfers, you have little recourse to get your money back. Also, go elsewhere if a site ever asks you for information that seems too personal or unnecessary for the transaction, such as your Social Security number.

    Shady contact information

    If the contact email given is a yahoo email address, or if there’s simply a form to fill out on the page instead of an address or phone number, watch out. Trusted retailers typically use their company name or the site’s domain name in their email address. An international contact number is another major sign something is amiss. Try calling the number if you suspect something isn’t right. If you don’t get an answer during normal business hours or the number isn’t in service, the site probably isn’t legitimate. You can also look up the website on GoDaddy’s WHOIS tool. WHOIS will show you the email address and phone number associated with the account, where the site is purportedly located, and the site’s creation date. If the site is located in China and the brand is based in New York, this could be a major tipoff.

    Unclear refund policy

    A trustworthy retailer will tell you how and where to return a product you’re unhappy with. Fake websites, on the other hand, will often have refund policies that are difficult to understand, hard to find or nonexistent. If you can’t find the policy, try contacting the company to ask them directly. Stay away if you get a vague answer. Also, if they’re shipping the product, they should give you an idea of when it will arrive. Be aware that the Federal Trade Commission requires sellers to ship items within 30 days of the order if no specific date is promised.

    Poor reviews

    Of course, bad reviews from other users is one of the biggest signs that a website is fraudulent. Type the company’s name and “scam” into Google and see if there are any complaints about the site. Also, you can check the Better Business Bureau for reviews or use their Scam Tracker tool to see if others have reported the site.

    If you think you’ve been scammed

    If you think you’ve already made a purchase from a fraudulent website, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, your state attorney general, or the Better Business Bureau.

    Trust your instincts

    Above all, go with your gut. DeMille says people are sometimes willing to suspend disbelief because they want the discounts they’re seeing to be real. “I think a lot of people kind of know in the back of their head that they’re on a website that’s maybe a little less reputable,” DeMille said. “If you have some hesitation, really dive in, do a little bit of research and try to determine if the website is official or not before putting in any of your credit card information.”

    CNBC’s “American Greed” looks at the dark side of the American Dream. Catch an all new episode Monday 10P ET/PT

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